Majestic’s Epsilon Scores 8 out of 10 at DPRP!!! – “This is a very good album indeed and definitely worth checking out.”

dprp
Majestic – Epsilon I
Majestic - Epsilon I
Country of Origin: U.S.A.
Format: CD
Record Label: independent
Catalogue #:  
Year of Release: 2014
Time: 54:41
Info: Majestic
Samples: Majestic website
Track List:
Chariots (11:10), Mother Dearest (9:29), Starlight (10:20), Epsilon I. Event Horizon (8:42), Epsilon II. Doorways (7:38), Epsilon III. Samskaras (7:22)

Jeff Hamel was the former guitarist in the American metal band Osmium in the 80s. The band existed for about ten years and after that Jeff took a long break from music. After that break he was fully charged again and ready to entertain everyone with his newly written material.

That music turned out to be quite progressive. It resulted in the album Descension (2007) and since then he has released a new album almost every year! In 2014 that has lead to the release of Epsilon I. The second part of this musical story called, surprisingly enough, Epsilon II will also be released this year. On the first Epsilon album, multi-instrumentalist Hamel (guitar, bass and keys) is assisted by his loyal companions Mike Kosacek (drums) and the vocalists David Cagle (Liberty & Justice), Celine Derval (Scythia) and Chris Hodges (Every Living Soul), who were also present on the 2012 album V.O.Z.

On this album, a vocalist we all know joins the ranks: Marc Atkinson (Riversea, Nine Stones Close andMandalaband). Hamel gets his inspiration from artists like Pink Floyd, Mike Oldfield, Dream Theater, Porcupine Tree, Black Sabbath, Ayreon, The Alan Parsons Project and Joe Satriani. This leads to a mixture of styles such as progressive rock, metal, psychedelic rock, space rock and folk music. The songs all have a playing time from seven to more than eleven minutes, so there is plenty of time to mix all those influences in one track. Most important, what about this album? Is it any good? The answer to that question is a definite ‘Yes’.

Chariots is the first and longest track on the album and the track I like the least, mainly because I like the other vocalists more than Chris Hodges.

Mother Dearest has the typical organ sounds like bands in the 60s and 70s and on this track Celine Derval, the only female lead vocalist on the album, delights us with strong vocals. It develops into a quite heavy rock song, with psychedelic elements and towards the end there’s a nice sing-along chorus.

Starlight is the track where we can hear the pleasant voice of Marc Atkinson together with atmospheric sounds on the keyboards. His voice alone takes this track to an even higher level. In the last minutes of the track, Hamel gets some time to showcase his skills on guitar before the song fades out with the whispering voice of Atkinson.

The last three tracks can be seen as one title track. It’s a combination of the excellent singer David Cagle, some beautiful keyboard sounds and some stunning soloing on guitar by Hamel, especially in Epsilon II and III. Furthermore the recording sounds great, so we can conclude that Hamel has succeeded in making another great album that will be enjoyed by many proggers.

Conclusion: 8.5 out of 10

Majestic – Epsilon II
Majestic - Epsilon 2
Country of Origin: USA
Format: CD
Record Label: Majestic Songs
Catalogue #: n/a
Year of Release: 2014
Time: 62:00
Info: Majestic
Samples: Majestic at Bandcamp
Track List:
Epsilon IV – Generations (5:32), Epsilon V – The River (Eridanus) (10:30), Epsilon VI – Incandescence (7:49), Epsilon VII – Ancient Echo (5:12), Epsilon VIII – The Journey Back (6:10), Epsilon IX – Welcome Home (2:15), Epsilon X – Convergence (11:55), Epsilon XI – Rise (6:38) , Epsilon XII – Fade (6:07)

Having my own modest home studio, I’m always amazed at the quality of musicianship and compositional skills of basically amateur “bedroom musicians” who are just as good, or even better, than those who make a professional living out of music.

The main man behind this musical project, Jeff Hamel, is no exception. He is one very gifted musician and songsmith. Jeff is part of a recording project called Proximal Distance where he and fellow musician Gregg Johns (Slychosis) can collaborate over the internet. Check out http://www.progressiverockbr.com/monthaprilproximaldistance2010.html for more information.

It is hard to pigeon-hole this Minneapolis musical effort in terms of the progressive genre. It is an accretion of musical styles and influences, ranging from symphonic through to heavy metal, prog metal. I can hear shades ofTransatlantic, Porcupine Tree and Dream Theater. Neo-prog is probably the closest genre but there are many hues of symphonic and space rock sprinkled throughout as well.

Until having to review this CD, I’d never heard of Majestic. This is the second of a two-part space odyssey that’s loosely based upon the star Epsilon which forms part of the Eridanus (The River) constellation. The two CD concept tells the story of a primitive civilisation that worships its sun and discovers that its roots are from another, very distant world whose sun caused their demise. According to Jeff there are some other meanings built into the lyrics but it’s up to the listener to interpret them and to formulate their own meaning.

I think it was Magenta‘s Rob Reed who said that a great prog track can be reduced to a mediocre rendering, if an average vocal is used for the music. This is a mistake made by many “one man” bands. With Majestic this is thankfully not the case since the vocals on Epsilon 2 are bordering on excellent. There are three vocalists used on this album: Chris Hodges, Jessica Rasche and David Cagle.

Jessica sings lead vocals on track 6, the shortest song on the album, which reminded me of Mostly Autumn. A simple, melodic ballad which also features good harmonies over a busy guitar solo. Jessica has a very fine voice but I think using Chris and David as the main singers, gives the album some extra gravitas.

Chris appears to get the lion’s share of singing duties and has lead vocals on tracks 2, 3, 7 and 8 – and boy does he have a great voice. For example in track 7, Epsilon X – Convergence he sings a beautiful, heart-felt delivery as if the lyrics have some personal meaning. This song is exceptional neo-prog. It slowly builds into a crescendo of sound with some great guitar playing before suddenly entering a sort of jazzy interlude, before the crescendo resumes with more menace: aggressive sounding vocals, power chords over good drumming. This, for me, is the best track on the album.

David sings on two tracks: 4 and 7. Once again his is another great voice. I don’t know how Jeff chooses between them for singing duties. Track 4 opens with cinematic synth strings before David enters. Once again a superb vocal delivery that simply takes this song up a few notches. In parts he is accompanied by electric piano and jangly guitar. The songs end with some very neat percussion. A great track.

There is plenty of scintillating guitar work from Jeff throughout the album. Probably the best, is his solo in track 7, which just fits the music perfectly and enters at the right moment. On keys, Jeff is very competent but personally I would have appreciated more up-front synth and organ solos in the vein of Neal Morse. Jeff conjures up some great atmospheric and aural delights on all of the songs with his guitar and keyboard playing.

Mike Kosacek’s drumming is very good on this album and it certainly adds to the dynamics of the material. He excels in many songs but for me his best work is in track 8. This song is probably the rockiest of the album and features more great guitar work from Jeff. Not my favourite track, but I can see other progsters who like Deep Purple andRush enjoying this song. Although the bass playing is OK over the whole album, and on a negative note, I felt it was a bit subdued and never really given any prominence in the mix. It would have been great to hear some Geddy Lee type bass runs to give the music some more gravitas.

Although Track 1 has the type pf symphonic opening that a band like Transatlantic would be proud of, it then enters a prolonged heavy power chord-driven phase which would have worked for me if the drumming and bass playing had been a bit more inventive to keep me interested.

Initially, while listening to the first track, I thought that this band was going to be a contradiction in musical terms, in the sense that they weren’t sure what they were or wanted to be and thus I was going to be disappointed. However, everything that followed made for enjoyable listening.

This is a very good album indeed and definitely worth checking out. I take my hat off to Jeff, and his efforts to create something very magical. As for the old DPRP neo-prog-come-symphonic Prog-o-meter, I score this a very respectable 8.

Conclusion: 8 out of 10

 

Review Epsilon 2 (French) – Profil.fm Rating 4.5 / 5 “So if you liked the first part, continue the journey with “Epsilon 2″, it will fill you completely.”

Jeff HAMEL (MAJESTIC) ne nous aura pas fait attendre longtemps, à peine six mois après la parution du premier volet « d’Epsilon » voici le second. Le tout dans une formation presque inchangée à deux instrumentistes accompagnés de trois chanteurs. Il est à noter le retour de Jessica RACHE au chant.

Après une introduction en douceur, MAJESTIC indique clairement la direction de ce nouvel opus : ce sera du lourd, sans être du métal écorchant, avec un gros son et une ambiance métallique généralisée, portée par des guitares furieuses et des parties vocales appuyées : côté féminin, le chant de Jessica RASCHE se rapproche des grandes chanteuses du genre, tandis que ses homologues masculins, David CAGLE et Chris HODGE haussent le ton et flirtent régulièrement avec les techniques en vogue dans ce style. Amateur de rock progressif plus apaisé, ne fuyiez  pas devant cette première approche, car Jeff HAMEL est avant tout passé maître dans l’art de mélanger les genres, et si les passages puissants sont bien présents tout au long des 12 plages de l’album, ils sont loin d’être seuls et sont de toute manière pleinement intégrés aux compositions qui s’avèrent tout sauf linéaires. Il en va ainsi notamment de l’incroyable instrumental « Epsilon VIII – The Journey Back »qui nous propose à la fois du progressif symphonique bien caractéristique des œuvres précédentes de MAJESTIC, complété par un final puissant, et comportant en son milieu une partie complètement R.I.O. – un jeu de guitare désarticulé planté sur une montée époustouflante des claviers, le tout  sur fond de rythmique proche de MAGMA, tout un jeu de baguette pour Mike KOSAREK.


Dans le même style, le mélange métal/sympho/RIO se retrouve sur le titre épique Epsilon X – Convergence, où durant près de 12 minutes MAJESTIC développe toute sa panoplie de sonorités, tant vocales qu’instrumentales, avec des passages métalliques qui, sans jamais franchir la ligne qui pourrait faire fuir les réfractaires au style, donnent une couleur et une puissance réjouissantes à une composition déjà passionnante par sa structure. Et pour parfaire le tout, et coller tout de même quelque peu au concept, le maître d’œuvre du projet complète tout cela par un jeu de claviers qui passe sans honte de sonorités 70’s à celle habituellement en vigueur dans le space-prog, apportant notamment dans les chorus une touche sonore qui rappellera ELOY. Quant à la production, elle est toujours aussi impressionnante, rendant avec justesse la puissance développée par les instrumentistes, et intégrant entre autres des effets stéréo bienvenus qui balancent le son de droite à gauche.


Dans la lignée de son prédécesseur, « Epsilon 2 » poursuit le voyage entamé avec le premier du concept, et s’avère tout aussi indispensable que son compagnon au sein des discothèques des amateurs de rock progressif varié. Malgré une tendance métallique plus poussée, qui, si vous connaissez MAJESTIC ne vous surprendra pas, cette seconde partie s’avère selon moi plus subtile que la première, et met fin à cette aventure au sein de la galaxie. Alors si vous avez aimé le premier volet, poursuivez le voyage avec « Epsilon 2 », il saura vous combler totalement.

Cote 4.5/5

Google Translation:

MAJESTIC – Epsilon 2 – Autoproduction – 2014

By Richard Hawey

 

Jeff HAMEL (MAJESTIC) will not make us wait long, just six months after the publication of the first part of “Epsilon” this is the second. All in an almost unchanged training two instrumentalists accompanied by three singers. It should be noted the return of Jessica RACHE vocals.
After a gentle introduction, MAJESTIC clearly indicates the direction of the new album: it will be heavy without being metal scratching, with a big sound and a general atmosphere metal, driven by furious guitars and vocals supported: feminine side the song of Jessica RASCHE approximates great singers of the genre, while her male counterparts, David CAGLE and Chris HODGE raise their voices and regularly flirt with the techniques in vogue in this style. Amateur calmer progressive rock, not were fleeing  not before this first approach, because Jeff is primarily HAMEL past master in the art of mixing genres, and if the powerful passages are present throughout the 12 tracks in the album they are far from alone and are in any case fully integrated into compositions that prove anything but linear. This applies especially to the incredible instrumental ”  Epsilon VIII – The Journey Back “ which offers us both the symphonic progressive feature of many previous works MAJESTIC, complemented by a powerful finish, and having in its center a completely part RIO – a set of disjointed guitar planted on a breathtaking climb keyboards, all against the backdrop of rhythmic close to MAGMA, a whole set of wand Mike Kosarek.
In the same vein, metal / symphonic / RIO mixture found on the epic title Epsilon X – Convergence , where for nearly 12 minutes MAJESTIC develops its range of sounds, both vocal and instrumental, with metal passages without never cross the line that could scare averse style, give a rosy color and power to an already exciting composition structure. And to top it all, and paste still somewhat in concept, the prime contractor for the entire project all by a set of keyboards passing unashamedly 70’s sounds that normally prevailing in the space-prog, bringing especially in the chorus sound that will remind key ELOY . As for production, it is still impressive, making accurately the power developed by the instrumentalists, and integrating among others welcome stereo sound effects that swing from right to left.
In the tradition of its predecessor, “Epsilon 2″ continues the journey started with the first concept, and is equally indispensable companion in the nightclubs of progressive rock fans varied. Despite further metallic trend, if you know MAJESTIC not surprise you, this second part proves to me more subtle than the first, and puts an end to this adventure in the galaxy. So if you liked the first part, continue the journey with “Epsilon 2″, it will fill you completely.

Rating 4.5 / 5

 

Tracks

  1. Epsilon IV. Generations (5:32)
    2. Epsilon V. The River (Eridanus) (10:29)
    3. Epsilon VI. Incandescent (7:48)
    4. Epsilon VII. Ancient Echoes (5:11)
    5. Epsilon VIII. The Journey Back (6:09)
    6. Epsilon IX. Welcome Home (2:14)
    7. Epsilon X. Convergence (11:55)
    8. Epsilon XI. Rise (6:37)
    9. Epsilon XII. Fade (6:07)

 

Musicians

– Jeff Hamel / Guitars, Clavierss
– Mike Kosacek / Drums, Percussion
With:
– David Cagle / Song on 4, 7
– Chris Hodges / Chant 2, 3, 7, 8
– Jessica Rasche / Chant 6

Review (French) – MusicWaves.fr – “the second part of Epsilon continues the journey started with the concept of the album I, and is just as indispensable as his companion”

From MusicWaves

A peine six mois après la sortie de la première partie de son concept cosmique (voir la chronique d’Epsilon I à ce sujet), Jeff Hamel et Majestic nous délivrent la suite et  la fin de l’aventure, dans une formation une nouvelle réduite à deux instrumentistes accompagnés de trois chanteurs.

Après une introduction en douceur, Majestic indique clairement la direction de ce nouvel opus : ce sera du lourd (je n’ai pas dit lourdingue !), avec un gros son et une ambiance métallique généralisée, portée par des guitares furieuses et des parties vocales appuyées : côté féminin, Jessica Rasche se rapproche des fameux “groupes de métal à chanteuse”, tandis que ses homologues masculins haussent le ton et flirtent régulièrement avec les techniques en vogue dans ce style.

Amateur de rock progressif plus apaisé, ne fuis cependant pas devant cette première approche, car Jeff Hamel est avant tout passé maître dans l’art de mélanger les genres, et si les passages puissants sont bien présents tout au long des 12 plages de l’album, ils sont loin d’être seuls et sont de toute manière pleinement intégrés aux compositions qui s’avèrent tout sauf linéaires. Il en va ainsi notamment de l’incroyable instrumental Epsilon VIII – The Journey Back qui nous propose à la fois du progressif symphonique bien caractéristique des œuvres précédentes de Majestic, complété par un final puissant, et comportant en son milieu une partie complètement Rio – un jeu de guitare désarticulé planté sur une montée chromatique aux claviers, le tout  sur fond de rythmique magmaïenne (chapeau à Mike Kosacek pour sa maîtrise du contretemps !) – l’ensemble s’avérant totalement bluffant.

Dans le même style, le mélange métal/sympho/Rio se retrouve sur le titre épique Epsilon X – Convergence, où durant près de 12 minutes Majestic développe toute sa panoplie de sonorités, tant vocales qu’instrumentales, avec des passages métalliques qui, sans jamais franchir la ligne jaune qui pourrait faire fuir les réfractaires au style, donnent une couleur et une puissance réjouissantes à une composition déjà passionnante par sa structure. Et pour parfaire le tout, et coller tout de même quelque peu au concept, le maître d’œuvre du projet complète tout cela par un jeu de claviers qui passe sans vergogne de sonorités 70’s à celle habituellement en vigueur dans le space-prog, apportant notamment dans les chorus une touche sonore qui rappellera Eloy. Quant à la production, elle est toujours aussi impressionnante, rendant avec justesse la puissance développée par les instrumentistes, et intégrant entre autres des effets stéréo bienvenus qui balancent le son de droite à gauche.

Dans la lignée de son prédécesseur, le deuxième volet d’Epsilon poursuit le voyage entamé avec l’opus I du concept, et s’avère tout aussi indispensable que son compagnon au sein des discothèques des amateurs de rock progressif varié. Malgré une tendance métallique plus poussée, cette deuxième partie s’avère pourtant plus subtile que la première, et clôture en beauté le voyage au sein de la galaxie Eridanus.

Google Translation:

Barely six months after the release of the first part of his cosmic concept (see the chronicle of Epsilon I to this), Jeff Hamel and Majestic we deliver the following to the end of the adventure, a new reduced training . two instrumentalists accompanied by three singers After a gentle introduction, Majestic clearly indicates the direction of the new album: it will be heavy (I did not say clumsy!), with a big sound and a metal mood widespread scope by furious vocals and guitars supported: women’s side, Jessica Rasche is close to the famous “metal bands with female singer,” while her male counterparts and raise their voices regularly flirt with the techniques in vogue in this style. I enjoy rock progressively calmer, however not flee before the first approach because Jeff Hamel is above all a master in the art of mixing genres, and if the powerful passages are present throughout the 12 tracks in the album, they are far from being alone and are in any case fully integrated into compositions that prove anything but linear. This applies especially to the incredible instrumental Epsilon VIII – The Journey Back , which offers us both the symphonic progressive feature of many previous works Majestic, complemented by a powerful finish, and having in its center a part completely Rio – a guitar playing disjointed planted on a chromatic rise on keyboards, all against the backdrop of rhythmic magmaïenne (Kosacek hat to Mike for his mastery of mishaps!) – all proving to be totally awesome. In the same vein, the metal mixture / symphonic / Rio is featured on the epic title Epsilon X – Convergence , where for nearly 12 minutes Majestic develops its range of sounds, both vocal and instrumental, with metal passages without ever crossing the yellow line that could leak refractory to style, color and give a grim power to an already exciting composition structure. And to top it all, and paste still somewhat in concept, the prime contractor for the entire project all by a set of keyboards passing shamelessly 70’s sounds that normally prevailing in the space-prog, bringing especially in the chorus sound that will remind key Eloy . As for production, it is still impressive, making accurately the power developed by the instrumentalists, and incorporating, among other stereo sound welcome swinging from side to side effects. In the tradition of its predecessor, the second part of Epsilon continues the journey started with the concept of the album I, and is just as indispensable as his companion in the nightclubs of progressive rock fans varied. Despite further metallic trend, this second part however is more subtle than the first, and end the trip in style in the Eridanus galaxy.

Review – Epsilon 2 (Polish) – “Experience a revelation discovering this majestic, fully creative and imaginative look through the prism”

Original Link

Majestic – Epsilon2
Autor: Andrzej Barwicki   
16.09.2014.

ImagePod koniec sierpnia ukazała się druga część albumu „Epsilon” amerykańskiego projektu  Majestic. O części pierwszej można przeczytać tutaj.

Druga odsłona to właściwie dokończenie historii, którą zespół opowiadał na poprzednim wydawnictwie. Całość mitycznego seansu rozpoczyna się od instrumentalnego nagrania  „Epsilon IV – Generations”. Tym mocnym progresywnym akcentem grupa Majestic kontynuuje swą opowieść dokładnie w tym miejscu, gdzie skończyła się część pierwsza. To bardzo udany początek, z którego w dość płynny i naturalny sposób przechodzimy do kompozycji „Epsilon V – The River (Eridanus)”, której urzekające partie instrumentalne oraz wokalne wpływają na pozytywne odczucia słuchacza, nie pozostawiając obojętnym chyba nikogo, kto słucha tych intrygujących dźwięków. Wsłuchując się w porywające i zmienne brzmienie zespołu Jeffa Hamela, które stanowi kolejny etap zdarzeń wpływających na dźwiękową ilustrację historii odkrywamy, że mamy do czynienia z misternie przemyślaną koncepcją.  Jej realizacja bezbłędnie oddaje nastrój i klimat tej mrocznej opowieści, co jest ważne przy tego typu koncept albumie. Kreowanie i budowanie odpowiedniego, istotnego w danej chwili dźwięku może nie zawsze nam się podobać, ale jako całość nabiera innej wartości, do której musimy się odpowiednio nastroić wsłuchując się w kolejne nagrania: „Epsilon VI – Incandescence” i „Epsilon VII – Ancient Echoes”. Oba stanowią bardzo mocne punkty programu płyty.                                                                                                                                                

Dużą rolę w brzmieniu Majestic odgrywają instrumenty elektroniczne, tworzące specyficzną aurę i pobudzające naszą wyobraźnię na tak tajemnicze brzmienie kolejnej części cyklu: oto rozpoczyna się, bowiem „Epsilon VIII – The Journey Back”. Utwór rozwija się powoli, ale nagle, w efektownej wokalnej oprawie wyłania się pięknie wykonany „Epsilon IX – Welcome Home”. Niesieni kobiecym wokalem niepostrzeżenie przechodzimy do następnego fragmentu: „Epsilon X – Convergence”. Czym bliżej końca płyty, tym z każdym odegranym akordem muzyka nabiera coraz to bardziej zmiennych i zaskakujących walorów trudnych do ogarnięcia za pierwszym przesłuchaniem.                                                                                                      

Pozwólmy więc, aby emocje opadły. Wtedy doznamy olśnienia odkrywając to majestatyczne, w pełni twórcze i kreatywne spojrzenie przez pryzmat artystycznego nieznanego nam świata zdarzeń i historii, która toczy się nada w innej czasoprzestrzeni. Kompozycja „Epsilon XII – Fade” w spektakularny sposób zamyka kolejną część epizodu tej niełatwej w odbiorze płyty. Z całą pewnością warto jednak pokonać uprzedzenia i wyruszyć w nieznany bezkresny muzyczny horyzont muzyki Majestic.                                                                                                                                         

Ciekawość niejednokrotnie powoduje w nas chęć zapoznania się z różną muzyką, ale w tym przypadku jestem głęboko przekonany, że najnowsza produkcja Majestic nas znowu nie zawiedzie i z pewnością wszyscy docenimy kolejne udane wydawnictwo zrealizowane przez Jeffa Hamela (gitary, instrumenty klawiszowe), Mike’a Kosaceka (perkusja) oraz udzielających się wokalnie Davida Cagle’a, Chrisa Hodgesa i Jessiki Rasche.       

English (Translated via Google)

At the end of August released a second part of the album “Epsilon” American project  Majestic . The first part can be read here .

The second edition is actually complete the story I told the team in the previous release. The whole mythical session begins with an instrumental recording of “Epsilon IV – Generations”. This strong accent progressive group Majestic continues his story in exactly the place where the first part ended. It’s a very good start, which is a fairly smooth and natural way to go to the composition of “Epsilon V – The River (Eridanus),” whose captivating instrumental parts and vocal affect the positive feelings of the listener, leaving neutral unless anyone who hears these sounds intriguing . Listening to the moving and changing sound of the band Jeff Hamel, which is the next stage of events affecting the sound illustration of the story we discover that we are dealing with intricately thought-out concept. Its implementation flawlessly captures the mood and atmosphere of this dark tale, which is important for this type of concept album. Creating and building appropriate, significant at a given time may not always sound to us like it, but as a whole takes on a different value, which must be properly tune listening to new recordings: “Epsilon VI – Incandescence” and “Epsilon VII – Ancient Echoes” . Both are very strong points of the program board.                                                                                                                                                

A large role in the version Majestic play electronic instruments, creating a specific aura and stimulate our imagination for such a mysterious sound the next part of the series: here begins, because “Epsilon VIII – The Journey Back”. The song develops slowly, but suddenly, in the impressive vocal housing emerges beautifully executed “Epsilon IX – Welcome Home”. Carried female vocals imperceptibly move to the next part: “Epsilon X – Convergence”. The closer the end of the board, including any odegranym chord music becomes more and more variables and surprising qualities difficult to grasp at first hearing.                                                                                                      

Let us, therefore, that excitement wore off. Then experience a revelation discovering this majestic, fully creative and imaginative look through the prism of artistic an unknown world events and history that goes give a different space-time. Composition “Epsilon XII – Fade” in a spectacular way closes another part of this challenging episode in the reception of the plate. Certainly, it is worth to overcome prejudices and embark on an unknown infinite horizon music musical Majestic.                                                                                                                                         

Curiosity often results in us the desire to get acquainted with different music, but in this case I am deeply convinced that the latest production Majestic will not disappoint us again and certainly all appreciate another successful release executed by Jeff Hamel (guitars, keyboards), Mike Kosaceka (drums), and providing the vocals of David Cagle’a, Chris Hodges and Jessica Rasche.       

Review – Epsilon 1 – Sea of Tranquility “If you are a progressive music fan, and I presume you are, please do not hesitate to pick up Epsilon 1, it is that good. “

Majestic: Epsilon 1
Posted by Jon Neudorf, SoT Staff Writer on 2014-09-14 18:33:21
My Score: 



Majestic is the brainchild of multi-instrumentalist Jeff Hamel. He formed the project in 2004 and their first album, Descension, was released in 2007. Epsilon 1 is the seventh album although I believe the follow up Epsilon 2 has already been released. I was looking forward to this one as I quite liked Arrival, the last one I have heard. I suppose I have some catching up to do.

Here Jeff teams up with drummer Mike Kosacek, who first appeared on the V.O.Z. album, and guest vocalists Marc Atkinson (Nine Stones Close), David Cagle (Liberty & Justice), Celine Derval (Scythia) and Chris Hodges (Every Living Soul). 

It shouldn’t come as a surprise the results are excellent beginning with the eleven minute “Chariots”. Calmer, spacier moments are mixed with heavier bits of prog metal riffs and melodic guitar work. “Mother Dearest” is even heavier with a huge organ intro, complex riff patterns and interesting keyboard effects. The shimmering “Starlight” is a lovely mid tempo slice of neo prog featuring Atkinson’s moody lead vocals. His voice has a wistful quality and when combined with Hamel’s wonderful synth textures and soaring leads the result is pure prog bliss. 

The last three tracks make up the epic “Epsilon” suite, a progressive tour de force with wonderful guitar and keyboard interaction. It is truly a majestic piece with multiple crescendos, spiraling lead guitar and a myriad of keyboard sounds. Cagle’s lead vocals are also very strong.

If you are a progressive music fan, and I presume you are, please do not hesitate to pick up Epsilon 1, it is that good. 

 

Original Link